“Invest in the South”: Protecting Abortion Access For Louisianans in Wake of Amendment 1

Nearly 800,000 Louisianans (38 percent of voters) voted “No” and over 1.2 million Louisianans (62 percent) voted “Yes” on Amendment 1, a change to the state constitution that could open the possibility for the state to criminalize abortion, should Roe v. Wade be overturned. Even after election results came in, many are still not sure what the amendment even meant.

So, what just happened in Louisiana?

80 Million No’s Mean No

The defeat of Donald J. Trump feels like emerging from a misogyny-trauma-hangover. The fact that he was ever elected and, as of this writing, has received over nine million more votes than his first run, is a massive global metaphor for rape culture.

For survivors of abuse and those who care for them, it was traumatic to watch his first ascendance to power, horrific to live through, and dehumanizing to have the prospect of a second term dangled in front of us. From the perspective of a women’s studies professor and life-long-feminist, one who is closer to sexual assault than anyone likes to be, the whole process felt traumatic.

“Madam Vice President”: Kamala Harris Makes History

Harris’s unprecedented rise as the first woman, who is also Black and South Asian, to serve as vice president forces us to recognize a woman from a richly diverse background has been chosen to lead one of the greatest democracies in the world.

America, at least half of it, can celebrate that we have chosen the path of inclusion, diversity and hope—even if we barely managed to do so.

Removing Trump from The White House Will Not Fix What’s Broken in America

This anti-democratic virus is more than a passing phase; it infects the soul of our democracy and reaches well beyond Trump. The president is only a symptom of a larger, endemic problem.

A defeat of Donald Trump at the ballot box will not undo the growing mistrust of the Supreme Court and concerns about its commitment to protecting fundamental civil liberties, including voting rights.

New Mexico Elects Its First All Women of Color House Delegation

New Mexico made history by electing its first U.S. House delegation made up of all women of color, the result of three races with women running in both major parties.

Democrat Deb Haaland, one of the first Native women in Congress, was elected to a second term against in the 1st Congressional District; Republican Yvette Herrell, a member of Cherokee Nation, defeated the incumbent in a closely-watched race in the 2nd; and Democrat Teresa Leger Fernandez was elected to represent the 3rd District, the first woman to hold the seat since its creation in 1983.