Elizabeth Warren “Pinkie Promises” to Keep Fighting for Feminism

Sen. Elizabeth Warren talks her new children’s book, the importance of connecting with youth and the future of feminism.

“The pinkie promises I’ve made with thousands of girls will stay with me always,” Warren said. “Those promises are a reminder of our strength, and I hope this book will encourage even the youngest readers to dream big—because that’s what girls do.”

October 2021 Reads for the Rest of Us

Enjoy this month’s list of 30 feminist books from writers who are women, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, AAPI, LGBIA+, queer, disabled and more. They all have a hint of enchanting, irresistible, impudent or irreverent imaginary within them. Some more than others. Can you find it? 

‘The Suffrage Road Trip’: A Tribute to Two Middle-Aged, Lesbian, Immigrant Suffragists

In “We Demand: The Suffrage Road Trip”, middle-aged lesbian Swedish immigrants Ingeborg Kindstedt and Maria Kindberg advocate for women’s suffrage in 1915.

I fell in love with Ingeborg and Maria when I retraced their route in 2015, and was astonished to find they’d gotten so little recognition for all they did—likely because they were older, working class women who spoke accented English.

Black Feminist in Public: Myriam Chancy Gives Voice to the Voiceless Among Survivors of Haiti’s 2010 Earthquake

Award-winning Haitian-American/Canadian writer and scholar Myriam Chancy’s newest novel, “What Storm, What Thunder,” commemorates the devastating January 12, 2010, earthquake that struck Haiti’s capital of Port-au-Prince, killing 250,000. The book has taken on new relevancy with the recent August 14 earthquake on the island.

Chancy discusses her new novel, the fate of her birth island, and why more people need to listen to Haiti’s women.

September 2021 Reads for the Rest of Us

Enjoy this month’s list of 30 feminist books from writers who are women, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, AAPI, LGBIA+, queer, disabled, and more. This list has given me new knowledge, deeper empathy, broader perspectives, much-needed laughter and increased inspiration. I hope you find something here that does the same for you. 

August 2021 Reads for the Rest of Us

With all the uncertainty and injustice in our daily lives, we each need to find ways to unplug and recharge. Of course, one way to do this is unwind with a great book. This list gives you 37 to choose from this month, from dark mysteries to feminist fantasies to gripping historical fiction.

A Memoir Of Family, Caregiving and Redemption: “Some Things Can Be Deleted, Just Often Not The Memory”

Deborah J. Cohan’s ‘Welcome to Wherever We Are: A Memoir of Family, Caregiving, and Redemption’ shows the complexities of unconditional love.

“My dad’s erratic meanness … was all mixed up with his erratic kindness. The erratic nature of it all actually became predictable—predictable erraticness, erratic predictability. … my dad’s behavior was all too often so impossible that I questioned her loyalty and why she stayed; I never really understood them together. Now at 49, I understand it better, through the prism of my own love for my dad, my own loyalty to him, even amid all that went on.”