Supporting Queer Youth as Life Moves Back to In-Person Spaces: “I Had to Conceal my Expression at Home”

LGBTQ people are 50 percent more likely to experience cyberbullying than their heterosexual peers. Strict anti-discrimination policies, queer representation and setting up a Gay-Straight-Alliance on campus are known to be effective prevention strategies—but these options disappeared during the pandemic. 

Now that most schools are back to in-person classes, educators and students are facing the challenge of rebuilding the safe spaces in-person that were lost during the past 19 months.

The Anti-CRT Movement: El Paso and Our Communities Deserve Better

The El Paso shooting wasn’t an accident. A young person fell down a rabbit hole of racial hate and violence on the internet and, without having the tools to navigate these dynamics, his actions were catastrophic.

We need young people to have the tools to understand race and racism.  We need young people to understand the ties between history and current events. We need young people to be the leaders to create a fair, compassionate, and socially just society. This reality will only happen if our curriculum reflects these values.  

Black Feminist in Public: Black Life, Literature and the Black Feminist Imagination—a Conversation Between Farah Jasmine Griffin and Janell Hobson

On September 25, Black feminist scholars Farah Jasmine Griffin and Janell Hobson took part in a public conversaton about their respective new books, discussing Black literature and the Black feminist imagination.

“When I talk about ‘Black feminist imagination,’ I am thinking of how Black women have been able to articulate the presence of an absence. How do we give voice to silence?”

On Banning Critical Race Theory in Schools: “The Pursuit of a More Just World” Requires Confronting Racism and Privilege

Black people make up just over 13 percent of the population—but 22 percent of the fatal police shootings, 47 percent of the wrongful conviction exonerations and 35 percent of the individuals executed by the death penalty.

What kind of schools and worlds are we attempting to create if reflecting, deconstructing and confronting racism and privilege aren’t regular practices?

From West Coast to Westminster, Five Feminist College Students on the Importance of Study Abroad

Five students reflect on the lessons they’ve learned and a unique perspective they’re developing while studying abroad with in a program focused on feminist pedagogies and content.

“We are the surgeons of humanity, trying to repair the damages inflicted by our ancestors while at the same time perfecting our technique so our tomorrow is an improvement from yesterday.”

Ms. Global: Muslim Leaders Make Women’s Rights Plea to Taliban; Pakistan Reckons with Femicide and #JusticeForNoor

The U.S. ranks as the 19th most dangerous country for women, 11th in maternal mortality, 30th in closing the gender pay gap, 75th in women’s political representation, and painfully lacks paid family leave and equal access to health care. But Ms. has always understood: Feminist movements around the world hold answers to some of the U.S.’s most intractable problems. Ms. Global is taking note of feminists worldwide.

This week: A former senior diplomat in Israel alleges late-President Shimon Peres sexually assaulted her in the ’80s; Morocco’s new Parliament elects most women ministers in country’s history; Soccer players in Venezuela and Australia join the global #MeToo movement; Pakistan struggles to come to terms with a gruesome femicide; and more.