Dr. Andrea Ghez, Only the Fourth Woman to Win the Nobel Prize for Physics, Shows the Rarity of High-Achieving Women in Science

Of more than 900 Nobel Prize laureates, 866 have been men, while only 56 have been women. Only 16 Nobel prize winners have been Black.

Last month, Ms. had the opportunity to speak with one of these women: Dr. Andrea Ghez, who won the 2020 Nobel Prize for Physics. As only the fourth woman (all of them white) to win the award for physics, Ghez understands the Nobel also confers on recipients the responsibility of serving as an international role model for girls contemplating careers in science and for women scientists.

How COVID-19 is Devastating Women’s Studies Programs Across the U.S.

It is clear the pandemic has bolstered support for a neoliberal framework for higher education, where certain forms of labor go unrecognized and the financial bottom line takes precedence over all else. It is also clear the most affected entities in this crisis are, unsurprisingly, gender and women’s studies, ethnic studies, Latinx studies, Asian American studies, African American studies and Indigenous studies programs.

What Women Can Expect from a Biden Presidency: On Work and Family

The work and family prong of Biden’s agenda for women includes high-quality, affordable child care for all families; free universal kindergarten for 3- and 4-year-olds; support for increased access to after-school, weekend and summer programs; programs to care for older Americans and people with disabilities; paid family and medical leave; and flexible, fair work schedules.

(This piece is the third of a multi-part series covering President-Elect Biden’s platform for women. New installations of the series will be released on Wednesdays.)

Race-Conscious Policies—Including Affirmative Action—Are Necessary For Addressing Racial Inequity

Affirmative action recently survived yet another legal attack when the First Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in Harvard’s favor in a case challenging affirmative action.

This latest case against Harvard demonstrates that color-blindness cannot uproot this country’s legacy of racism. We must face race head-on to meaningfully address the racial inequality that persists in our society.