Rights Advocates Rejoice as the New Biden Team Is Assembled

Biden’s White House staff is falling into place, and Cabinet members are being announced: Antony Blinken will be Biden’s secretary of state; Linda Thomas-Greenfield will become the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations; Michèle Flournoy will be secretary of defense; John Kerry will focus on climate change; Alejandro Mayorkas has been nominated secretary of the Department of Homeland Security; Avril Haines has been nominated for director of national intelligence; and Jake Sullivan will be the national security adviser.

Georgia Senate Candidates on the Issues

The election didn’t reveal a decisive winner for either Georgia Senate seat—which means Tuesday’s runoff election will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

Here’s where the Georgia Senate candidates—Sen. Kelly Loeffler, Rev. Raphael Warnock, Sen. David Perdue and Jon Ossoff—stand on the issues, from COVID-19 and immigration, to criminal justice and the economy.

Patriarchy’s Post Election End Days

Even with President Joe Biden in office come January, Trumpism will still be with us, as will the Proud Boys, the faux militia Wolverine Watchmen, the civil war-promoting Boogaloo Boys, and the ex-military/police Oath Keepers.

As 2020 draws to a close, we need to acknowledge the connection between those groups’ brutish expression of patriarchy and its white-collar counterparts, like Mitch McConnell and Brett Kavanaugh.

“Invest in the South”: Protecting Abortion Access For Louisianans in Wake of Amendment 1

Nearly 800,000 Louisianans (38 percent of voters) voted “No” and over 1.2 million Louisianans (62 percent) voted “Yes” on Amendment 1, a change to the state constitution that could open the possibility for the state to criminalize abortion, should Roe v. Wade be overturned. Even after election results came in, many are still not sure what the amendment even meant.

So, what just happened in Louisiana?

Georgia Residents: Everything You Need to Know to Vote in the January Runoff

During the 2020 presidential election, two U.S. Senate seats were up for grabs in Georgia. In both races, none of the candidates received the needed 50 percent of the vote to win, meaning Georgia will have a general election runoff on January 5, 2021.

The election results will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate. Voters have until December 7, 2020 to register to vote in the runoff.