California Leads the Way in Educating Students on Racial History—But Vigilance Is Still Needed

When it comes to progressive politics, the Golden State can’t be messed with, historically leading the way in many areas including the environment, labor and education.

But while the state is known for liberal, progressive politics, we should not be lulled into thinking that those politics are without blemish. In California in 2019, Black teenagers accounted for 60 percent of the deputy contacts on campuses—but made up only about 20 percent of the enrollment in those schools.

Black Feminist in Public: Myriam Chancy Gives Voice to the Voiceless Among Survivors of Haiti’s 2010 Earthquake

Award-winning Haitian-American/Canadian writer and scholar Myriam Chancy’s newest novel, “What Storm, What Thunder,” commemorates the devastating January 12, 2010, earthquake that struck Haiti’s capital of Port-au-Prince, killing 250,000. The book has taken on new relevancy with the recent August 14 earthquake on the island.

Chancy discusses her new novel, the fate of her birth island, and why more people need to listen to Haiti’s women.

Critical Race Theory Panic: “A Tried and True Playbook Move”

Critical race theory, a framework that aims to teach how racism has shaped U.S. laws and institutions, is being banned in classrooms around the country. Republicans are using critical race theory as a dog whistle to mobilize suburban white voters against Democrats.

“It would be laughable if it weren’t so dangerous,” said law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw, a founder of critical race theory.

Monique DeBose’s Feminist Anthem “Brown Beauty” Is a Love Letter to Black and Brown Women

Los Angeles based singer, activist and spiritual coach Monique DeBose has a new song dedicated to all women of color.

“My intention with this song was to put it out at this point in time as just a celebration. I feel like for so long, we have not had the spaces and the public squares to just celebrate and acknowledge ourselves. If we’ve done it, it’s had to be in enclosed circles, and at this point, I’m ready now to just have it be out in public in a way that like has no shame has no trepidation, no insecurity.”

Black Feminist in Public: Tiya Miles Explores the Historical Baggage of Slavery

This week leads into the weekend celebration of Juneteenth, honoring the emancipation in 1865 of those who were enslaved in this country. The Black Feminist in Public series will highlight three scholars of slavery studies and Black women’s histories.

Our third and final focus is Tiya Miles, professor of history at Harvard University and author of All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley’s Sack, a Black Family Keepsake.