Invisible Abuse: Ending Coercive Control in Intimate Relationships

Coercive control laws are an important part of addressing the abuse you cannot see, and preventing the physical violence that often follows from it.

“Coercive control is a gateway to physical violence,” said Doreen Hunter, co-founder of the Americas Conference to End Coercive Control. “A high percentage of people who engage in coercive control will eventually resort to physical violence.”

Help Send Ms. to Women in Prisons and Domestic Violence Shelters

The Ms. Prison and Domestic Violence Shelter Program lets women on the inside know they are not alone. Every American should be ashamed that this country puts a greater proportion of its citizens in prison than any other nation on earth, because of racism, sexism and also because in many states, the Prison Industrial Complex allows corporations to build and run prisons for profit.

Why Preventing Violence Against Women Requires Men and Boys

Under usual circumstances, risk factors for violence perpetration include job loss, economic stress, substance abuse, depression and feelings of isolation; all of these issues have worsened as the pandemic has continued. As a result, intimate partner violence and femicide have increased dramatically.

To end violence in society, we must address the drivers: the perpetrators of violence who are most often men and boys.