Biden Just Canceled Significant Amounts of Your Student Loan Debt. Here’s How to Claim It

The Biden administration announced it would cancel significant amounts of student debt for millions of Americans, marking the largest discharge of education debt in U.S. history. Under the new plan, individual student loan borrowers earning under $125,000 per year (or $250,000 for households) qualify for up to $10,000 in loan forgiveness. Recipients of Pell Grants are eligible for an additional $10,000 in forgiveness.

Student loan debtors are disproportionately women, who hold about two-thirds of student loan debt—yet earn just 74 percent of what men graduates earn. Black students are also disproportionately plagued by student loan debt: More than 70 percent of Black students go into debt, compared to 56 percent of white students.

Kansas Voters Overwhelmingly Reject Anti-Abortion Amendment in Primary Election

If passed, a proposed constitutional amendment on Kansas’ primary ballot in August would allow more than 20 laws restricting abortion to stay in effect, including mandatory ultrasounds and biased counseling to discourage abortion, a 24-hour waiting period, parental consent for minors, a 20-week abortion ban, a ban on telemedicine abortion and limitations on public funding and insurance coverage for abortion.

Feminist and equity-focused groups urge Kansas voters to vote “no” on the amendment.

Celebrating 50 Years of Ms. Magazine with the National Women’s History Museum

This Sunday, July 24, join the National Women’s History Museum for their [email protected] digital programming series—this weekend, themed “Celebrating 50 Years of Ms. Magazine.” The fireside chat will take place 12–1:30 p.m. PT (3:00–4:30 p.m. ET) and will explore the past and present of Ms. with executive editor Kathy Spillar; historian Beverly Guy-Sheftall; and historian Amy Farrell; moderated by Carmen Rios.

Watch Live: Experts Break Down a Supreme Court Term Unlike Any Other

Today the U.S. approaches the end of a Supreme Court term unlike any other—leaving many to wonder about the Court’s commitment to equality, inclusion and nondiscrimination.

On July 6, Michele Goodwin will be joined by leading experts in constitutional law, criminal justice, women’s rights, administrative law, the Second Amendment, and free speech; together, they will give an overview of this term, what’s at stake, and what comes next.

Access to Birth Control Is in Danger if Roe is Overturned

In a post-Roe world, legislators—most of whom have no medical expertise and cannot get pregnant themselves—in one state could assert that life begins at fertilization, while a neighboring state could say life begins at birth.

Next, all hormonal contraception and IUDs might be outlawed just because some people believe they interfere with implantation and therefore “endanger” the new “life.” Defining personhood as starting at fertilization also has significant implications for in vitro fertilization, a process that creates fertilized eggs.

Ms. Relaunches Abortion Petition That ‘Changed Abortion Rights Movement’

In 1972, when abortion was still illegal throughout most of the country, 53 well-known U.S. women courageously declared “We Have Had Abortions” in the pages of the preview issue of Ms. magazine. The Washington Post credited the petition with the “start of a powerful strategy in the U.S. abortion rights movement: ending the secrecy that had kept many women out of the fight.”

The next year, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that abortion was a fundamental right protected by the U.S. Constitution. This year, the Supreme Court appears poised to reverse this position. In this perilous time, Ms. is relaunching the petition—with the encouragement and support of some of the original 1972 signers. This year alone, the petition has garnered almost 7,000 signatories.

Student Loan Debt Is a Gender Issue, Especially for Women of Color

The student loan debt crisis is at an all time high, with 45 million people carrying an estimated $1.7 trillion in federal student loan debt. Women carry roughly two-thirds of it. Black and Brown women are disproportionately impacted by this issue. 

Economic inequality, as influenced by class, race and gender, further increases each day student loan debt cancellation is delayed.