Amy Coney Barrett’s ‘Happy Go Lucky’ Haitian Children and the White Savior Narrative

Despite the national political drama that is swirling, in many ways, last week’s Senate hearings to approve Justice Amy Coney Barrett were uneventful (especially in comparison to the confirmation hearings that took place two years ago for Brett Kavanaugh). But, for me as a Haitian-American scholar who writes about representations of Haiti and Black girlhood, there was a moment that disturbed me.

It’s Her Choice: Amy Coney Barrett Can Refuse SCOTUS Confirmation

“As one of Amy Coney Barrett’s University of Notre Dame faculty colleagues … I am troubled by the circumstances of her meritorious rise. … Along with scores of my colleagues, in the interests of justice, I signed a letter outlining objections to her nomination. But I am going further here and asking Barrett to take the risk of refusing final confirmation now.”

*If you agree with the 74 percent of Americans who believe the Senate should be prioritizing COVID-19 relief, instead of pushing through a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court, call your senators at (202) 224-3121.

The Confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett—and the End of Roe as We Know It

The result of an Amy Coney Barrett confirmation is clear: It will lurch the Court significantly to the right. The tenuous balance struck in June Medical Services will be lost.

The next abortion case to reach the Court (maybe a gestational limit, a fetal heartbeat law, a ban on an abortion procedure, or ban on sex and race selection) will likely find a much friendlier audience in this new Supreme Court.