Feminist Twitter Mourns Dueling Tragedies of 9/11, COVID and Racism

It’s been 19 years since the 9/11 attacks forever changed the social and political fabric of the U.S.. On the anniversary of the attacks, feminists are mourning the tragedy, while also reflecting on our current convergence of crises, including racial injustice and a pandemic that has taken 50 times the number of lives lost in the 9/11 attacks—while receiving only a fraction of the government attention and response that the attacks received.

Conventional Ignorance: Belva Davis Confronts Violent Racism at the 1964 RNC

At the very outset of what would become an award-winning career as a TV journalist, Belva Davis confronted violent racism at the 1964 Republican National Convention, at which conservative Arizona senator Barry Goldwater was nominated for the presidency. Her memory of that daunting experience reminds us that we’ve been through change followed by backlash before.

“Day one of the convention had been tense but orderly. … Day two was starting to spin out of control.”

We Heart: BLM Protester Samantha Francine Stares Down Racism

When faced down by racist man Jay Snowden at a Black Lives Matter protest in Whitefish, Montana, Samantha Francine pushed up her sunglasses so she could stare right back at him. She did not back down.

“I have not always been this version of myself. It has taken a long time for me to find my strength the way I did that day. … This is the first time in 27 years I have truly found my voice as a woman of color.”

Powerful Statements from Leading U.S. Officials on Racism and Police Brutality

The U.S.—currently fighting two pandemics: coronavirus and racism—is in desperate need of healing and leadership. Yet the current president, a role sometimes referred to as “mourner in chief,” refuses to lead our nation’s mourning. Luckily, other notable U.S. leaders have stepped in to express solidarity with the protestors and recognize the nation’s collective pain.